Christian Pastor in China Gets One-Year Prison Term in Battle Over Crosses

imagesPastor-Huang-Yizi

Pastor Huang Yizi, who had been held in a “black jail” (secret detention centre) since September 2015, was released last Friday ( Feb.5th 2016) and reunited with his family. Read China Aid’s brief report of his release.

ICC Note:

A year in prison was the sentence handed down to pastor Huang Yizi (pictured above). He was found guilty of “gathering crowds to disturb social order.” Pastor Huang questioned the government as to why 50 of his parishioners were beaten while authorities attempted to illegally remove the cross from his church building. One month later, in July 2014, he was arrested. 

By Kiki Zhao

3/24/2015 China (NY Times)-A Christian pastor who defended local churches when the Chinese authorities removed church crosses was sentenced to one year in prison on Tuesday night by a court in Zhejiang Province.

The pastor, Huang Yizi, was sentenced by the People’s Court in Pingyang County after being convicted of “gathering crowds to disturb social order,” said Mr. Huang’s lawyer, Zhang Kai. Mr. Zhang said that he would appeal the court’s verdict.

Last July, Mr. Huang, a pastor of the government-sanctioned Fengwo Church in Pingyang, and several local residents asked the Pingyang County government to explain why the police beat more than 50 parishioners when they tried to stop government authorities from taking down the cross from Salvation Church, a Protestant church in Pingyang. Mr. Huang was arrested in August, and the Salvation Church’s cross was toppled several days after his arrest.

The trial on Tuesday attracted more than 400 people, mostly local Christians, who gathered outside the Pingyang court to wait for a verdict.

More:

A Chinese pastor has been sentenced to a year in prison for his involvement in a protest against the removal of a cross from a church in Zhejiang province.

Huang Yizi, who leads Fengwo Church in Wenzhou, was sentenced by the People’s Court in Pingyang County on Tuesday. His lawyer said he would launch an appeal.

Pastor Huang was first arrested on 2 August 2014, just over a week after an attack on Wenzhou’s Sjuitou Salvation Church. The police had attempted to remove a cross from its roof, resulting in a bloody clash with members who were guarding the building.

Officers reportedly used iron batons to beat those who stood in their way, and one member of the congregation suffered a fractured skull. The cross was eventually removed from the church building.

Huang then gathered a crowd from his congregation at a government building to demand answers about the incident. He also urged other church leaders to put back crosses which had been removed from their buildings and criticised police violence on his blog. He branded the removal of church crosses an example of “severe persecution” and an “insult” to China’s Christians.

He was arrested for “gathering to assault a state organ”, and could have faced up to seven years in prison.

According to advocacy organisation China Aid, more than 500 Christians stood outside the court on Tuesday in solidarity with Pastor Huang. China Aid founder and president Bob Fu has criticised the verdict, and called for Huang’s release.

“China Aid condemns this new case of religious persecution against an innocent pastor,” Fu said.

“Through arbitrary arrest, baseless prosecution, and illegal procedures throughout the trial, this case shows once again the worsening situation of religious freedom and rule of law in China. We call upon China’s higher authorities to overturn this unjust decision and free Pastor Huang immediately.”

Christianity has grown dramatically in Zhejiang province, and Wenzhou is known as the ‘Jerusalem of the East’ because of its large Christian population. The recent crackdown on churches has led many to believe that the government is specifically targeting Christians in a bid to retain control. Estimates vary, but more than 300 churches are thought to have been demolished, while many others have had crosses removed.

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